Adapted sports for adult wheelchair users

Posted - February 2017 in Living with HSP - Management & Treatment News

Positive influence on quality of life

 

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The message is clear – participation in adapted sports for people with mobility limitations delivers multiple advantages.

 

 

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This Canadian study showed that people with mobility limitations playing adapted team or individual sports and people without such limitations have a similar quality of life.

 

 

Participation in adapted sports was identified as having positive effects on self-esteem, self-efficacy, sense of belonging, participation in meaningful activities, society’s attitude towards people with mobility limitations, and physical well-being.

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Learn more about adapted sports and what is available around the country:

http://www.australiandisabilitysport.com.au/directory-of-disabled-sport.html

http://scoredsr.org.au/

https://www.clearinghouseforsport.gov.au/knowledge_base/organised_sport/sport_and_government_policy_objectives/persons_with_disability_and_sport

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BACKGROUND:

Occupations, including physical activity, are a strong determinant of health. However, mobility limitations can restrict opportunities to perform these occupations, which may affect quality of life. Some people will turn to adapted sports to meet their need to be involved in occupations. Little is known, however, about how participation in adapted sports affects the quality of life of people with mobility limitations. This study thus aimed to explore the influence of adapted sports on quality of life in adult wheelchair users.

 

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METHODS:

A mixed-method sequential explanatory design was used, including a quantitative and a qualitative component with a clinical research design. A total of 34 wheelchair users aged 18 to 62, who regularly played adapted sports, completed the Quality of Life Index (/30). Their scores were compared to those obtained by people of similar age without limitations (general population). Ten of the wheelchair users also participated in individual semi-structured interviews exploring their perceptions regarding how sports-related experiences affected their quality of life.

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RESULTS:

The participants were 9 women and 25 men with paraplegia, the majority of whom worked and played an individual adapted sport (athletics, tennis or rugby) at the international or national level. People with mobility limitations who participated in adapted sports had a quality of life comparable to the group without limitations (21.9 ± 3.3 vs 22.3 ± 2.9 respectively), except for poorer family-related quality of life (21.0 ± 5.3 vs 24.1 ± 4.9 respectively). Based on the interviews, participants reported that the positive effect of adapted sports on the quality of life of people with mobility limitations operates mainly through the following: personal factors (behavior-related abilities and health), social participation (in general and through interpersonal relationships), and environmental factors (society’s perceptions and support from the environment). Some contextual factors, such as resources and the accessibility of organizations and training facilities, are important and contributed indirectly to quality of life. Negative aspects, such as performance-related stress and injury, also have an effect.

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CONCLUSIONS:

People with mobility limitations playing adapted sports and people without limitations have a similar quality of life. Participation in adapted sports was identified as having positive effects on self-esteem, self-efficacy, sense of belonging, participation in meaningful activities, society’s attitude towards people with mobility limitations, and physical well-being. However, participants stated that this involvement, especially at higher levels, had a negative impact on their social life.

 

SOURCE: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2017 Jan 25;15(1):22. doi: 10.1186/s12955-017-0597-9. PMID: 28122621 PMCID: PMC5264324 [PubMed – in process]

 

How does playing adapted sports affect quality of life of people with mobility limitations? Results from a mixed-method sequential explanatory study.

 

Côté-Leclerc F1, Boileau Duchesne G1, Bolduc P1, Gélinas-Lafrenière A1, Santerre C1, Desrosiers J1,2, Levasseur M3,4.

 

1 School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue North, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada.

2 Research Center on Aging, Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux (CIUSSS) de l’Estrie, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada.

3 School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue North, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada. [email protected]

4 Research Center on Aging, Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux (CIUSSS) de l’Estrie, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada. [email protected]

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