Pelvic floor spasticity a problem with HSP

Posted - February 2015 in Living with HSP - Management & Treatment News

Physiotherapy proves helpful

 

Pelvic floor spasticity can lead to bowel and bladder problems, pelvic pain and sexual dysfunction. Physiotherapy can lead to a significant improvement in these problems and a better quality of life.

 

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Background

Pelvic floor (PF) hypertonic disorders are a group of conditions that present with muscular hypertonia or spasticity, resulting in a diminished capacity to isolate, contract, and relax the PF. Their presentation includes voiding and sexual dysfunctions, pelvic pain, and constipation. Various factors are associated, such as complicated vaginal birth, muscular injury, scar tissue formation, and neuropathies.

 

Study Design

The case of a single patient will be presented, together with the management strategies employed.

 

Case Description

A woman with hereditary spastic paraparesis and a history of muscle spasticity and urinary and fecal complaints since childhood. She presented to this institution seeking treatment for pelvic pain, pain during intercourse, constipation, and micturition (urination) problems. A physical therapy protocol was developed, with the trial of several treatment modalities.

 

Outcome

After some failed attempts, perineal and pelvic floor stretching proved to be very efficacious therapies for this patient’s complaint, leading to improved pain during intercourse, constipation, pelvic pain, and urinary stream.

 

Discussion

PF spasticity can lead to severe disability and interfere with daily basic functions, such as micturition and evacuation. Physical therapy plays an essential role in the management of these patients and can lead to significant improvement in quality of life.

 

SOURCE: Case Rep Obstet Gynecol. 2014;2014:306028. Epub 2014 Nov 12.


Physical Therapy in the Management of Pelvic Floor Muscles Hypertonia in a Woman with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia.

Ribeiro AM1, Ferreira CH2, Cristine Lemes Mateus-Vasconcelos E3, Moroni RM4, Brito LM5, Brito LG6.


1Rehabilitation Center of Hospital das Clínicas, Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.
2Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor System, Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.
3Rehabilitation Center of Hospital das Clínicas, Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil ; Barão de Mauá University Center, 14090-180 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.
4Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.
5Federal University of Maranhão, 65080-805 São Luís, MA, Brazil.
6Rehabilitation Center of Hospital das Clínicas, Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil ; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

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