Take your scooter (or wheelchair) for a ride

Posted - December 2012 in Living with HSP - Management & Treatment News

A car rack can extend your universe

 

People who get a motorised scooter as their walking ability declines often say how wonderful it is to be able to go places and do things that they thought they may never do again; to regain lost freedom, mobility, and confidence.

 

Steve loading his scooter onto the rack.
Canine companion Sumo supervising.

For those who also have a scooter rack fitted to the car, the benefits of having a scooter can be multiplied. With a scooter rack, you can take your scooter with you on outings, visiting friends or relatives, or going on holidays. You can do things and go places that would otherwise be impossible or unmanageable… things that have perhaps not been on your list for quite some time.

 

Steve transporting the rack

Manufacturers recommend a full-size family sedan as a minimum to handle the 150 kg Load (approx) of scooter and rack combined. It takes 2 people to mount or dismount the rack (43 kg) from the car, although it can be left on for extended periods as it locks upright when not in use. There is a lot of information on the different websites, including photos and videos, detailed specifications, and frequently asked questions. Cost of a rack is around $1,500. Racks are also available for wheelchairs.

 

HSP community member, Steve Lunn, said: “Being able to transport my scooter has improved my quality of life. It has made it possible for me to enjoy many of the activities that most people take for granted. The scooter rack gets used about once a month and reopens some doors that have closed over the last few years. Without the scooter and the rack I would not have been able to take the driving holiday through the Flinders ranges and the Eyre Peninsula that we recently enjoyed. ” (Read about Steve’s trip on his blog: hsptraveller.blogspot.com.au).

wheeled stand makes it easy

 

Steve also said:

  • The car needs to be fitted with the correct towbar – a Hayman Reese 50mm hitch is recommended by the manufacturer.
  • With the rack weighing 43kg, my wife and I found it awkward to fit onto the car. With a little thought and the help of a friend with a welder, we built a stand on wheels to move the rack around and I can now hitch the rack to the car with no assistance in around 10 minutes. The rack could be left on the car in the tilt up position, but since I don’t need it all that often, I prefer to take it off. More details and pictures of the mobile stand are on the blog. Editor’s Note: some racks now come fitted with wheels for ease of transport.

 

Websites

http://www.scooterrack.com.au/

 

http://www.scootersmart.com.au/

 

http://www.tasmobility.com.au/index.html

 

http://www.alwayspromptrepairs.com.au/products/mobility-scooter-carrier/

 

http://www.mobilityscooterscanberra.com.au/

 

https://www.ilcnsw.asn.au/items/7091

Comments on this story

  1. Peter posted at 12:58 pm on 19 December 2012Reply

    How spot on is the opening comment in the article ‘Take your scooter (or wheelchair) for a ride.’ People who get a motorised scooter as their walking ability declines often say how wonderful it is to be able to go places and to do things that they thought they may never do again; to regain lost freedom, mobility and confidence.

    In July of this year after shopping with my daughter for a couple of hours (looking for a birthday present for my grandson) I realised that my mobility had deteriorated to such an extent that to continue to do some of the things that brought immense pleasure to my world, I would need some form of motorised assisstance.

    So began my search for something suitable. I settled on a portable scooter, http://www.travelscoot.com.au. I have had my scooter since August, my quality of life has improved remarkably. The scooter is only 16kg and folds up to easily fit into the boot of a car and it also travels for free on airlines.

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